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WHAT IS ACCESSIBILITY AND THE AODA?

In todays evolving world, there is a lot of talk about Accessibility.

Traditionally, people thought of accessibility in terms of wheelchair ramps and designated parking spots. Accessibility encompasses much more than that!

The term “Disability” covers a broad range and degree of conditions, some visible and some not visible. A disability may have been present from birth, caused by an accident, or developed over time. There are physical, mental and learning disabilities, mental disorders, hearing or vision disabilities, epilepsy, drug and alcohol dependencies, environmental sensitivities, and other conditions.

AODA

Accessibility for
Ontarians with
Disabilities Act

In 2005, the Government of Ontario passed the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). Its goal is to make Ontario accessible by 2025. Accessibility standards are being created as regulations under the AODA. These standards are rules that businesses and organizations in Ontario must follow to identify, remove and prevent barriers so that people with disabilities will have more opportunities to participate in everyday life.

Its goal is to make Ontario accessible by 2025. Accessibility standards are being created as regulations under the AODA. These standards are rules that businesses and organizations in Ontario must follow to identify, remove and prevent barriers so that people with disabilities will have more opportunities to participate in everyday life.

Standards are being created in key areas of daily life. The Customer Service Standard was the first accessibility standard to become law. The next four standards — Information and Communications, Employment, Transportation and Design of Public Spaces — were combined under one regulation called the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation or IASR. The IASR is now law.

Who has
to comply
with the
regulation?

Every business and organization operating in Ontario that:

  • provides goods, services or facilities to the public or other organizations, and
  • has at least one employee.
  • If your organization has not taken the required steps to fulfil your legal obligations with the AODA, please contact us immediately so we can help you work towards compliancy. Please know there are fines associated with not fulfilling your requirements under the AODA and they can be hefty.

AODA FINES INCLUDE:

Up to

$50,000

for each and every day or part day that an offence happens

For corporations, up to

$100,000

for each and every day or part day that an offence happens